Category

Research

Seal genomics at the Gordon Conference

By | Presentation, Research

Kristina presented her findings on the impacts of historical bottleneck, recent recovery, and geographic expansion in gray and harbor seals* at the Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Ecological and Evolutionary Genomics in Biddeford, Maine.  GRC’s are scientific meetings with an explicit focus on cutting-edge research and promoting scientific discussion.  This year’s meeting spanned the spectrum from model to non-model system, and from theoretical to empirical.  It left me feeling inspired and excited to apply new sequencing technologies and analytical pipelines to marine mammal species in an effort to better understand their ecology and evolution.

*Stay tuned for new publications that summarize this work soon!

New publication: Cost of tolerance

By | Publication, Research

In collaboration with new marine physiology professor, Nishad Jayasundara, and collaborators at Duke University, we’ve published our findings on the cost of evolving tolerance to anthropogenic pollutants in the Atlantic killifish.  These fish represent a “natural experiment” in which to study the evolution of toxin resistance; they have evolved the ability to survive exposure to high levels of PAHs, making it possible to inhabit Superfund sites in the Elizabeth River, Virginia.  In this system, our new paper explores the hypothesis that the evolution of resistance to one stressor makes organisms more susceptible to other stressors.  For more information, check out our paper here.

Marine mammal genomics in the UMaine news

By | Research

Check out this news article on our recent open-access paper on marine mammal genomics. The paper, co-authored by a group of international marine mammal scientists, summarizes two recent workshops on marine mammal genomics held at the Society for Marine Mammalogy Biennial Conferences in 2013 and 2015. We review the primary options for generating genomic data, introduce several emerging techniques, and discuss the suitability of each approach for different applications in the study of non-model organisms. The original paper published in the Journal of Heredity can be found here.