All Posts By

Kristina Cammen

Emma Newcomb’s research featured by UMaine

By | Research, Student News, Uncategorized

Emma Newcomb has spent this semester conducting research on the cases in our state-wide marine mammal stranding database that involve human interaction with seals.  This work is part of our current NOAA Prescott grant-sponsored research and Emma’s role in the research is supported by an award from the Center for Undergraduate Research.  Emma’s research was recently featured by UMaine in a series on ongoing undergraduate research leading up to our annual UMaine Student Symposium.  Check out her video, produced by Cammen Lab member, Holland Haverkamp.

 

New publication on pinniped recovery

By | Publication

We are excited to announce our newest publication that came out last week in Ecosphere. In this article, my co-authors (Bob Steneck and Doug Rasher) and I review the parallel histories of exploitation, decline, protection and recovery that are shared by pinniped species that breed within the contiguous US. We then discuss some of the challenges we face following recent pinniped recovery – and mention the interdisciplinary, collaborative, and multi-stakeholder approaches currently being taken in the Northwest Atlantic as one approach that may be successful in dealing with these challenges!

Figure 1. An adaptive management perspective on the path of protected species management in response to human-induced depletion.

Our open source article is freely available online at https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ecs2.2579.

Happy New Year! Marine Mammals in the News (2018) – by INT308 students

By | Teaching

Happy New Year!  Interested in learning about some of the scientific discoveries related to marine mammals from the past year.  Check out the annual Marine Mammals in the News online publication, produced by undergraduate students in INT308 (Marine Mammal Ecology and Conservation).  From whales to manatees, from the Arctic to the Antarctic, from conservation to physiology, and much more – check out the stories they wrote, highlighting marine mammal science that has been published within the last year.

Season’s greetings!

By | Uncategorized

Season’s greetings and Happy New Year from the Cammen lab! Check out UMaine’s season’s greetings video, featuring our very own Alayna Hawkins (at 0:42 into the video), in a photo taken by our very own Holland Haverkamp. It’s great to see our students representing what lab work can look like at the University of Maine.

Best wishes to all for a happy, healthy, and productive 2019!

Congratulations CUGR Fellows!

By | Student News

Congratulations to Emma Newcomb and Liz Piotrowski on receiving fellowships from the UMaine Center for Undergraduate Research (CUGR)!  Both Emma and Liz were named AY 2018-19 CUGR Fellows.  Their fellowships will support research in: “Effects of human interaction on marine mammal strandings and call reports in the Gulf of Maine from 2010 to 2015” (Emma) and “Using eDNA sampling as a mechanism for improving marine mammal conservation through a non-invasive and cost efficient technique” (Liz).

 

Recruiting PhD student in ecological genomics… of birds!

By | Student News

As part of a new, collaborative NSF-funded research and training program in the genomic ecology of coastal organisms, we are recruting a PhD student who will study genome-phenome relationships in the wild.  The student will be expected to conduct both field work and genomic analyses towards understanding adaptation and the links between plumage phenotypes (color, resilience to wear, and microbiomes) and reproductive fitness across sparrow species.  Field work during summer months may involve supervising field crews in tidal marshes across the Northeast US, from Maine to Virginia.  Genomic analyses will include candidate gene sequencing, gene expression analyses, and microbiome characterization.

The student will be co-advised by Drs. Kristina Cammen (http://cammenlab.org) and Brian Olsen (https://sbe.umaine.edu/olsen-2/), through the Ecology and Environmental Sciences program at the University of Maine, located in Orono, an hour to the ocean and an hour and a half to Maine’s highest peak.  The student will also have the opportunity to work in collaboration with a diverse team of investigators, graduate students, and undergraduate students at the Universities of New Hampshire and Maine studying the ecological genomics and eco-evolutionary feedbacks of adaptation in tidal marsh birds.

The successful candidate must have a strong background in ecology and/or genomics. Preferred candidates will have demonstrated experience with field work, in particular, bird mist-netting (previous time as a federal banding sub-permittee strongly preferred), as well as experience in genetics, genomics, and/or bioinformatics. Consistent with our program scope and to advance an integrated understanding of adaptation in nature, we are especially interested in candidates who show promise to work in an inclusive and diverse collaborative environment and to engage intellectually across the diverse scales of genomes, phenomes, and environmental feedbacks. Individuals who are intellectually curious, responsible, willing to learn, team-oriented, and have attention to detail are encouraged to apply. An M.S. in a related field is preferred, but qualified candidates with extensive experience will be considered.

To apply, please send a cover letter describing your qualifications, including your commitment to diversity and inclusion in collaborative science, a curriculum vitae, unofficial transcripts, and the contact information for at least three references to kristina.cammen@maine.edu and brian.olsen@maine.edu with “Ecological Genomics PhD Student Search” as the subject line of your email. All applications received before November 14, 2018 will receive full consideration, and applications will be accepted on a rolling basis thereafter until the positions are filled. A start date of January 2019 is strongly preferred.

Cammen Lab visits Marine Mammals of Maine Triage Center

By | Lab News, Uncategorized

(left to right) Lynda Doughty, Alayna Hawkins, Sarah Burton, Shannon Brown, Emma Newcomb, and Emma Spies at the Marine Mammals of Maine triage facility in Harpswell, ME.

Lynda Doughty, executive director and stranding coordinator, of Marine Mammals of Maine hosted a visit of several of our lab members to MMoME’s seal triage and rehabilitation center this past weekend.  This was a particularly exciting visit for our students who have hours and hours of experience working with marine mammal stranding data in our custom-built electronic database, and our students who spend most of their time at a lab bench working with seal DNA.  Lynda gave us a tour of the facility and shared stories and lessons learned from the past several months of crisis response to a federally-designated Unusual Mortality Event that more than tripled the number of seals they were called to respond to, compared to previous years.  We talked about several ways to strengthen our partnership between the University of Maine and MMoME, with a particular focus on how students can be involved.  To support one ongoing research collaboration, we also collected a water sample from a seal rehab pool for continued eDNA (environmental DNA) method development. Thank you, Lynda, for hosting our visit!

Sarah Burton collects a water sample for eDNA analysis.

Emma Newcomb presents at 2018 SEA Fellows Symposium

By | Uncategorized

Emma Newcomb, a 2018 SEA Fellow and Cammen Lab undergraduate research assistant, presented her research at a public, student-focused symposium held at the Darling Marine Center in Walpole, Maine earlier this week.  The symposium was attended by >80 scientists, industry and community members, and the interested general public.  Over 20 undergraduate students presented posters about their summer research experience, all linked by a shared goal to improve our understanding of the Maine’s coastal ecosystem to help benefit our coastal communities and economies. You can read more about the 2018 SEA Fellows Symposium here.

Photo by Holland Haverkamp

Emma’s research focused on classifying and quantifying marine mammal-human interaction cases that are observed in Maine and recorded by our collaborating stranding organizations, Marine Mammals of Maine and Allied Whale.  Human interaction cases are currently categorized nationally as boat collision, gunshot, fisheries interaction, and “other”, and we are working to further describe this hard-to-define “other” category, which is this the most common type of human interaction for our stranded marine mammals in Maine.  These interactions are normally typified by a human approach within 150 yards and oftentimes referred to as marine mammal harassment.

We would like to acknowledge the University of Maine System’s Research Reinvestment Fund (RRF) for their support of Emma’s summer research experience, part of an Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Research Collaborative grant.  Emma will continue her research in this area during the academic year, supported by a NOAA Prescott grant.